Certificate in Aging Services

agingservices_0Are you looking for a career in a rapidly growing field that needs people with a broad range of skills?

Would you like to work in a field that will be personally rewarding and improve people’s lives?

JOB OUTLOOK IN AGING SERVICES:
In the 21st Century Americans are not only living longer, but also represent great diversity in needs and interests. Unprecedented growth is projected in all service-providing industries, and almost limitless opportunity exists for the development and delivery of new products and services.

  • New opportunities are emerging daily in the development and delivery of aging products and services. Individuals who understand older adults’ needs, strengths, and limitations, as well as their cognitive, physical, and social functioning, will be well-positioned for today’s competitive marketplace.
  • More than a single profession, Aging Services/Gerontology provides a specialist overlay to any profession serving our aging population.
  • Many states are expected to experience dramatic workforce shortages, in existing as well as emerging professions. In addition to Health Care, demand will be high for qualified applicants to work in Financial and Legal services, Leisure, Travel, Hospitality, Fitness and Wellness pursuits, among others.
  • According to current data provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, the population 65 years and over will increase to 55 million in 2020 (a 36% increase for this decade). By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons in the U.S., almost twice their number in 2007 and roughly 20 percent of the U.S. population.
  • Demand for healthcare workers will remain particularly strong due to the mounting healthcare needs of the burgeoning elderly population. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “the health care and social assistance industry is expected to be the most rapidly growing sector in terms of employment” through 2020. It is projected that employment will increase by 34.5 percent in healthcare support occupations and 25.9 percent in healthcare practitioner and technical occupations through 2020. There is a growing demand for workers in long-term care in particular as more of the elderly require nursing home care, residential care, adult day care, and home care.

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau

PROGRAM OF STUDY
The Certificate in Aging Services program consists of eight courses, 24 credits, with an option for students to fulfill an internship experience. The certificate has four required core courses and four elective courses. Students have the flexibility to specialize either in the Direct Service Care track or Aging Administration trackthrough elective courses.

CORE COURSES (4 courses, 12 credits):
Aging & Health

This course examines the physical process of aging and the effects on physical health, mental health, social and economic factors and relationships. These topics are applied to disease prevention, health promotion, health maintenance, and selected disorders that affect health and independent living. Public policy and program development issues will be addressed and incorporated into management and administration of aging services.
SOC230E Aging in Society
An introduction to the critical sociological study of aging and old age in human society. The contemporary Western response to age is explored by contrasting it with other definitions and treatment of age in societies other than our own. The experience of aging, the medicalization and institutionalization of old age, and the survival strategies of old age are examined.
Policy and Aging
This course analyzes federal, state, and even local aging policies, and reviews economics of aging on a macro level. Topics include the Older Americans Act, the relationship between aging policy and service provision, policy analysis (including the concepts of entitlements and intergenerational issues), lobbying, advocacy, allocation, health care financing (e.g. Medicare, Medicaid, insurance, HMO’s/managed care), financial support (e.g. Social Security and private pensions), costs of long-term care versus community based care and the process of aging. Also, implications for caregivers, both formal and informal, will be discussed. Topic discussions may be enhanced through the use of various media (movies, internet) and/or live speakers.
PSY186E Psychology of Aging
The central theme of the course is that behavior at each stage of an individuals life should be viewed as the product of the dynamic interaction between the social system and the personal system as each system reflects both stability and change over time. The course simplifies and elaborates the gerontological knowledge base which, combined with professional values, enhances skill development in service to aging persons, families, and groups.
ELECTIVE COURSES (12 credits, choose four courses from one of these tracks):

Direct Service Aging Care Track / Electives:
This track is designed for students wishing to enter the aging field as Healthcare Services professionals.
Ethics in Aging

As the “baby boomer” generation begins to reach the ages when access to government and other benefits becomes increasingly important, the reality of funding shortages will also become a sharper reality. How should limited resources be offered to this growing elder population? Will they be allocated, and how? Is allocation ethical? And, as the society moves forward, how will other changes affect elders? What issues in politics, healthcare, housing, economics, etc., touch the lives of elders? Will the results be positive, or negative? And, what of the elongation of life? Will this be a “positive” for a growing elder population?
SOC224E Gender Issues in Society
An analysis of the relationship between the gender-role differences and experiences of women and men within the major institutional spheres of society. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the gender-related structures of marriage, family, religion, education, and work, and to examine areas of conflict and change in gender roles in these institutions.
IDS213E Well Informed: Growing Old with Health & Wisdom
As America ages, we look forward to continued advances in life expectancy, but only recently have we attempted to ensure that we live out this increased life expectancy with full mental, social and physical health and vigor. This course is an adventure in wellness for seniors, families, human service professionals and health care providers. Topics include “normal” aging, coping with memory loss and depression, health choices and rights, disability, medications and alcohol, and community resources. “Grow old along with me, the best is yet to be…” R. Brownin
HRS421E Loss and Bereavement Across the Lifespan
This course will address the topics of loss, grief, bereavement, aging, and the dying process from a humanistic perspective. The course will examine the role of spirituality, culture, gender, and developmental stage in responding to loss. This course will address the role that helping professionals and fellow human beings can play in facilitating and encouraging the natural, healthy, and healing expression of emotions related to loss. In this course, students will learn that grieving evokes strong emotions and strong emotions can be overwhelming if they are not spoken in the presence of someone who can accept and no judge. Therefore, students in this course will be taught how to be present with someone experiencing strong emotions related to loss and death, how to respond to feelings shared by others experiencing grief and loss, and how to encourage others to accept and cope with strong emotions related to loss and grief. (Fall/Spring)
THE341E Moral Issues in Health Care
This course is an introduction to medical ethics. It studies the questions of genetic control, birth and the family and abortion. It further examines the rights of the patients and the responsibility of medical personnel. The questions of death, death with dignity, suicide and euthanasia are investigated
SOC122E Social Problems
This course explores the dilemma of modern society and the social problems associated with it. Understanding the dilemma as one in which society provides a stable social order and protects cherished values, while at the same time it generates and sustains serious social problems, the course explores some remedial responses as well. Topics may include: drugs, crime, alcoholism, poverty, sexism, abortion, injustice, suicide, racial discrimination, mental illness, aging, pornography, and disease.
SOC241E Sociology of Health and Illness

This course critically examines the structural arrangements of medical practice and of medical settings in relation to their economic, social and cultural contexts. The primary focus is on societal and professional responses to illness and the growing concern about the “health care crisis” in the United States. Topics include: the emergence of the medical professions; the growing medicalization of society; the social and economic organization of the medical sector; medical care giving institutions; practitioner-patient interaction; comparative medical care systems; and the future of American health care.

Spirituality of Aging
Available Upon Request
SOC223E The Family in Society
The institution of the family is studied from historical and cross-cultural perspectives that focus on the relationship between macro-social developments and changes in family structure. A comparative view is conjoined with a problems approach in order to examine contemporary family patterns and their alternatives.
IDS205E Women and Aging
This course in social gerontology invites students to examine important issues in the field of gerontology through analysis of current films and literature depicting the lives of older women in contemporary American society and culture. For each class, students view a movie and/or read a fictionalized or journalized account of the life of an older woman. The course includes discussion and analysis of these cultural materials in light of sociological, psychological and biological theories and research in the field of social gerontology.
• Internship (required for students that are not already working in the field)

Aging Administration Track / Electives:
Designed for professionals in the aging field or those wishing to enter the field as administrators. Students will be prepared for positions in organizations working in the health field in an administrative or management capacity; or in organizationss working to market to or attract the aging population.
IDS222E Elder Law

As life expectancy increases and the population of America ages, there is a growing focus on the law as it applies to the elderly. This course covers a wide variety of topics, including: transferring assets; wills, trusts, and conservators; guardians, medical treatment, and housing; financing health care; long term care insurance; Medicaid and Medicare; and tax issues.
PLS203E Estates and Trusts
This course covers descent and distribution, wills (probate and administration), fiduciary accounting, and various types of trusts.
Ethics in Aging
As the “baby boomer” generation begins to reach the ages when access to government and other benefits becomes increasingly important, the reality of funding shortages will also become a sharper reality. How should limited resources be offered to this growing elder population? Will they be allocated, and how? Is allocation ethical? And, as the society moves forward, how will other changes affect elders? What issues in politics, healthcare, housing, economics, etc., touch the lives of elders? Will the results be positive, or negative? And, what of the elongation of life? Will this be a “positive” for a growing elder population?
HCM200E Health Care Administration
This course examines the important aspects of health care administration and introduces students to topics which constantly challenge health care executives. Topics include management of health care facilities, hospital administration. hospital information systems, hospital and physician reimbursement, managed care, multi-provider systems, integrated health systems, business ventures in health care, quality improvement, materials management, and cost containment. Prerequisite: MG100E
ECO238E Health Care Economics
This course examines the economic processes and activities of health care systems and institutions. Major issues including cost containment and the role of government, competition, market analysis, and the role of insurance are among the topics discussed to help students understand how economic considerations affect the delivery of care. Prerequisite: ECO110E

Health Care Financial Management
Available Upon Request
Marketing of Aging Services
The course introduces fundamental marketing principles then layers issues specific to aging services and healthcare organizations. Students will develop a foundational knowledge of marketing concepts and practices, marketing decision-making techniques, and strategies utilizing contemporary business examples and will apply that knowledge in the healthcare or aging services industry.
• Internship (required for students that are not already working in the field)

For information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who have completed the Aging Services program, and other important information, visit here.


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